EBOOK CATALOGUE FOR …MERCURIAL SILENCE…

Posted on May 16, 2014 in collections

Below is a link to the ebook version of the catalogue for …mercurial silence…, the limited run print version will be available shortly after June 1 – more on how to purchase soon…

http://issuu.com/carolinegore/docs/cg_issuu?e=11999154/7891970

…MERCURIAL SILENCE…

Posted on January 12, 2014 in exhibitions

…mercurial silence…

I stopped.
He responded with four words, “emptiness transforms personal landscape.”
The words sunk deep into my chest.

The exhibition …mercurial silence… is the culmination of an investigation of how grief and loss manifest in society. Comparative meanings were sought through multidisciplinary research of historical jewelry, Roman myth, and materials and objects as they relate to commonalities across human experience.

Memorializing tragic events through leaving objects and ephemera at sites of violence and tragedy is now pervasive: in doing so we attempt to process what has happened, honor victims, and give some physical form to loss. However this was not the case 30 years ago – we tended to walk away from the actual site and perhaps more directly towards one another.

Looking closer at objects in relation to personal losses – how does one thoughtfully negotiate possessions of loved ones received through inheritance? As in processing grief there is no clear answer, instead we search our lived experience as it reveals itself over time through remembering and forgetting. Objects we have lived with, that others have chosen and lived with, are often murky and become laden with a multitude of meaning. Transformation of these objects, while at first may seem an act of violence in itself, offers to make the negotiation physical – despite the persistence of grief continually marking and changing the interior of ourselves.

 

Rose Netzorg and James W. Kerr  Gallery, Richmond Center for Visual Arts, Western Michigan University
January 9 – February 14 2014 (opening reception January 15th 5-7:30)

public lecture January 16 5:30pm
2008 Richmond Center for Visual Arts, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan

Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts, Race Street Gallery, Grand Rapids, Michigan
February 28 – April 27

 

image above:
revenir (performed)
in collaboration with Mary Whalen
tintype
2013

A limited run of catalogues featuring essays on this work will be available in the late spring – if you would like to reserve a copy, please contact me directly.

…RESONANCE…

Posted on January 12, 2014 in exhibitions

A solo exhibition of new drawings:

The works included in …resonance… possess a tautness between imagined constructions and emotive suggestion and were selected from over 100 drawings produced between 2009 and 2013.

January 10 – 31
Epic Center – James C. Westin Gallery
359 S. Kalamazoo Mall
Kalamazoo, Michigan

February 28 – April 27
Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts
2 Fulton St. West
Grand Rapids, Michigan

image: dust up
drawing: paper
30 x 44 inches
2012

This exhibition received support from Western Michigan University and the Arts Fund of Kalamazoo County through the Arts Council of Greater Kalamazoo.

50/50 EQUAL PARTS

Posted on January 12, 2014 in exhibitions

LIGHT OF THE MOON

Posted on December 26, 2013 in exhibitions

I sent two of my favorite pieces to this exhibition, juried by Namita Wiggers-Director and Chief Curator at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in partnership with Pacific Northwest College of Art in Portland, Oregon.

For more information please visit Arrowmont’s website… click here!

Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts – Gatlinburg, Tennessee
January 18 – March 15th
opening January 18th 4 – 8 pm

Here is the statement I sent in with the work:

I have lived in the same house in Michigan for 9 years – I have watched the landscape bloom, die, and come back again as the seasons have passed. What has not changed over this time is the regularity of my acute observation. This small plot of land surrounding my urban house is known and its rhythm has become a part of my everyday. In the summer the spiders set their webs in relatively the same spaces, and I know where the birds are nestled in overnight. The cardinals chirping at dusk signal me to stop working for the day, and their singing in the morning stirs me out of bed. In the winter – when everything is quiet and frozen – I miss the regularity provided by the natural world outside. I find myself at a loss when it is time to shut the windows – trying to find my own rhythm in the stillness of my house and the darkness of the cloud covered sky. The resulting work is a referential signal to this fragility and impermanence.

SHIFT: CONTEMPORARY MAKERS THAT DEFINE, EXPAND AND CONTRADICT THE FIELD OF ART JEWELRY

Posted on October 18, 2013 in exhibitions

Tonight three works from my upcoming exhibition …mercurial silence… will preview at the opening of SHIFT: Contemporary Makers that Define, Expand and Contradict the Field of Art Jewelry as part of the Indiana University ZOOM symposium at The Grunwald Gallery of Art in Bloomington, Indiana.

The exhibition is simply wonderful featuring over 70 pieces from 25 artists.  More information here:  http://www.iub.edu/~zoom/Shift.html

A huge thank you to IU faculty Randy Long and Nicole Jacquard and their wonderful students for all of the hard work… enjoy the opening!

SIAMESE CONNECTION – BROOKLYN METAL WORKS

Posted on July 30, 2013 in exhibitions

A lovely invitation card from the Siamese Connection exhibition at Brooklyn Metal Works located in Brooklyn, New York. Two chatelains and one brooch from 2011-12 are in this exciting exhibition.

Check out the Brooklyn Metal Works website for more information: http://bkmetalworks.com

THE HEIDELBERG PROJECT – DETROIT, MICHIGAN

Posted on January 19, 2013 in out of the studio

In search of beautiful wool, leather & fur – I took a road trip to the best place for such things in Michigan – Haberman Fabrics in Royal Oak. While there I also met up with a dear friend and she suggested we drive over to see the Heidelberg Project…  it was getting dark, the sunset was an amazing coral pink/red, and the flaccid stuffed animals were flapping around in the wind…

http://www.heidelberg.org

1930’s ADLER 30-1 PATCHING MACHINE

Posted on January 14, 2013 in in the studio

I went for it….  after experiencing the dreaminess of the little portable Adler, I was determined to find a 30-1, and through a generous reply from a nice chap who writes a really informative vintage & industrial sewing machine blog (http://ucansew2.blogspot.com/) I found a good source for used industrial machines in Florida, and guess what they had for sale….  aside from every sewing machine under the sun….

My Adler 30-1 showed up in Kalamazoo from Miami last week… I am now in pretty deep realizing what parts I am missing, learning what a bobbin tire is, thinking about not using the motor to operate the machine and other random this and that…  first a call into the manufacturer with an antiquated parts request….

 

 

1930’s ADLER HOME SEWING MACHINE – ASTRID!

Posted on January 14, 2013 in in the studio

The latest equipment added to the studio is a collectable Adler home sewing machine manufactured sometime around 1930 in Germany.  This machine has a solid steel body with a very familiar pebbled enamel surface, what a gorgeous industrial grey/green!

Since early 2012, I have been researching a better ways of working with and sewing leather.  I started out by talking with some very nice people at sewing stores across Michigan about industrial sewing machines and finally ending up at the local cobbler where I was introduced to Adler sewing machines, specifically patch machines such as the Adler 30-1.  I briefly researched these machines and was overwhelmed, slightly intimidated and I put the idea of an industrial sewing machine of any kind on hold.  In December I saw this Adler on eBay and I grabbed it up despite zero assurances of the working condition – I was hopeful and ignored the “looks like it has barely been used” statement from the seller which was just vague enough to be either functional or non-functional. Once the machine arrived I quickly realized it was in need of some minor rehab work – a tension adjustment, and a general mechanical overhaul. So I found a local sewing mechanic willing to take a look at the vintage beauty and within a day the Adler was off and running with a really pretty lockstitch and the power to punch through delicate leather pieces.

Since acquiring this machine I have gathered a lot more information on industrial and vintage machines which in turn leads to more confidence as I navigate towards securing the sewing machines I need in the studio.  For now I am continuing to look for vintage Elna and/or Pfaff free arm machines… and of course still holding onto the dream of an Adler 30-1…